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FAQ's

Translation:

1. What is the difference between a professional translator and a non-professional person?

In order to save some money, you could try to have your document translated by a non-professional translator. However, translations are not simple tasks that involve only the translation of equivalent terms. It is the conveying of the message by finding the most accurate equivalents, by writing this same text into the target language taking into account the target language’s grammar and syntax, keeping the same register without violating this message by paraphrasing, embellishing, expressing opinions, omitting or adding anything, in an extremely accurate fashion. Yes, accuracy is the key word here. The quality would not be the same at all. Only a professional translator would be able to know when to use a specific equivalent, given the subject matter of your text, be it technical, general or literary. Through exhaustive terminology research, professional translators are equipped to translate your text into the target language without that dreaded “accent” that can ruin your overseas business-doing.

If one of your concerns is the appropriate use of a specific terminology, I would be glad to use a glossary supplied by my customer. I also like to work closely with my customers to clarify terminology-related confusion that may arise from texts.

As a full-time professional translator, I invest in training programs, professional seminars, professional associations, dictionaries and research resources to better serve you, my client.

I am a professional translator with a BA in Translations from one of the most well-known universities in Brazil. I am also a Certified Member of STIBC (Society of Translators and Interpreters of British Columbia).

2. Why cannot you translate into European Portuguese?

This is one of the most frequent questions I am asked. Portuguese is a language spoken in many different countries: Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, East Timor, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Portugal and S. Tomé and Príncipe – eight in total. Therefore, as the French spoken in France differs from the French spoken in Quebec and the English spoken in Canada differs from the English spoken in England, Scotland, Australia, New Zealand, USA and others, the Portuguese spoken in any of the Portuguese-speaking countries in the world differs in word choices, grammar, spelling and syntax from the Portuguese spoken in Brazil. In some cases, the European Portuguese word choice can even be funny or offensive in another Portuguese-speaking country or vice-versa. Consequently, it would be wise to choose a Brazilian Portuguese-speaking translator to translate a text targeting the Brazilian market and a European Portuguese-speaking translator, if targeting Portugal.

3. What are your rates for translations?

Translations are priced per word, as well as are proofreading and editing projects. As translation, editing and proofreading projects can significantly vary in price, please call me or send me an email with the specifics of the project (refer to my Rates page, please).

4. Do you offer discounts in translations?

Yes. Documents over 3000 words long are entitled to a special discount. Please call me or send me an email with the specifics of the project (refer to my Rates page, please).

5. How can I send you my documents?

Documents can be sent by email, mail or fax. Please see contact page for details.


Interpreting:

1. What is the difference between a professional interpreter and someone who speaks the language?

When interpreting for a client or a patient in different venues, I always take a short version of my “blurb” to ensure that both the professional and the person I am interpreting for know how to work with a professional interpreter. My Code of Ethics includes: accuracy, partiality/neutrality, personal limitation, professional limitation and confidentiality. An untrained person may add or omit information that is crucial for your treatment or law suit, either consciously or unconsciously; they may be biased and not see that they are not well equipped to do this kind of job; and confidentiality is paramount so your personal life is not known by people in the community. As a professional interpreter, I received professional training to follow the Code of Ethics and carry out an interpreting assignment according to its tenets, so the interpreting session runs as smoothly as possible.

Also, only a professional interpreter would be able to know when to use a specific equivalent, given the subject matter of the interpreting assignment. Through exhaustive terminology research, professional interpreters are equipped to interpret what you say into the target language without corrupting its meaning.

As a full-time professional interpreter, I invest in training programs, professional seminars, professional associations, dictionaries and research resources to better serve you, my client.

I am a professional interpreter with a BA in Interpreting from one of the most well-known universities in Brazil. I am also accredited by Vancouver Community College in Court, Health Care and Community Interpreting, by the PHSA in Mental Health Interpreting and an IRB (Immigration and Refugee Board) Certified Interpreter.

2. What are your rates for interpreting assignments?

Interpreting assignments are priced per hour, depending on the subject matter. As interpreting assignments can significantly vary in price, please call me or send me an email with the specifics of the assignment (refer to my Rates page, please).

3. What is the difference between an interpreter and a translator?

This question is another very common one as people use the word “translator” for both. Please, bear in mind that an interpreter works with the spoken language, that is, everything that is said by the speaker, is interpreted into the target language by the interpreter.

A translator works with the written language, that is, they work on a text that is written in a source language and translate it into the target language.


Portuguese Lessons:

1. How long does it take to learn Portuguese?

As I have been teaching for over 15 years, I have seen people mastering the Portuguese language in a very short time and others taking far longer than expected. It depends on the number of lessons you have in a week, your dedication to studying the language and how much practice you do on your own. Usually, the average time is two years.

2. Why do you recommend a 1 ½ hour-lesson twice a week?

It has been my experience that two lessons a week is the right amount of time for people who are busy, always on the go and on business trips. They can practice more during the week on their own and bring questions to lessons. Also, while teaching, I find that I need some time in the beginning of the lesson for some warm-up and review. A one-hour lesson would be too short to teach a new grammar point or vocabulary as well. But do not worry – our lessons are dynamic, with loads of fun and interaction!


Payment:

1. What are the methods of payment?

All major credit cards through Paypal, company checks, electronic funds transfers and bank drafts are accepted. More details are specified in your invoice.

2. What payment methods do you prefer?

Payments may be made via Bank transfer, PayPal or cheques.
 
 


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